New opportunity: AstraZeneca to fund Compass PhD project

Novel semi-supervised Bayesian learning to rapidly screen new oligonucleotide drugs for impurities.

This is an exciting opportunity to join Compass’ 4-year programme with integrated training in the statistical and computational techniques of Data Science. You will be part of a dynamic cohort of PhD researchers hosted in the historic Fry Building, which has recently undergone a £35 million refurbishment as the new home for Bristol’s School of Mathematics.

This fully-funded 4 year studentship covers:

  • tuition fees at UK rate
  • tax-free stipend of up £19,609 per year for living expenses and
  • equipment and travel allowance to support research related activities.

This opportunity is open to UK, EU, and international students. 

AstraZeneca is a global, science-led biopharmaceutical business whose innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. Oligonucleotide-based therapies are advanced novel interventions with the potential to provide a step-change in treatment for many. Nevertheless, as oligonucleotides are large complex molecules they are currently very difficult to profile for impurities, as the analysis is labour intensive and the data complexity is high.

About the Project

The aim of this PhD is to develop Bayesian data science methodology that does this automatically, accurately, and delivers statistical measures of certainty. The challenge is a mathematical one, and no chemistry, biology or pharmacological background is expected of the student. More specifically, we have large batches of mass spectrometry data that will enable us to learn how to characterise the known oglionucleotide signal and deconvolute it from a number of known and unknown impurities longitudinally, in a semi-supervised learning framework. This will allow us to confirm the overall consistency of the profile, identify any change patterns, trends over batches, and any correlation between impurities.

The end goal is to establish a data analytics pipeline and embed it as part of routine analysis in AstraZeneca, so impurities can be monitored more closely and more precisely. The knowledge can then be used to identify possible issues in manufacturing and improve process chemistry by pinpointing impurities associated with different steps of the drug synthesis. This project would also improve the overall understanding of oligonucleotides and therefore, serve as a key step towards establishing an advanced analytical platform.

Project Supervisor

The PhD will be supervised by statistical data scientist Prof Andrew Dowsey at Bristol in collaboration with AstraZeneca. Prof Dowsey’s group has extensive expertise and experience in Bayesian mass spectrometry analytics (e.g. Nature Comms Biology 2019Nature Scientific Reports 2016) and leads the development of the seaMass suite of tools for quantification and statistical analyses in mass spectrometry.

Application Deadline

Application Deadline is 5.00pm Friday 18 June 2021. Please quote ‘Compass/ AstraZeneca’ in the funding section of the application form and in your Personal Statement to ensure your application is reviewed correctly. Please follow the Compass application guidance.

Interviews are expected to be held in the week commencing 12 July.

Launch of industry-focused seminar series DataScience@Work

Compass is excited to announce the launch of the DataScience@work seminar series. This new seminar series invites speakers from external organisations to talk about their experiences as Data Scientists in industry, government and the third sector. The dual meaning of DataScience@work focuses talks on both the technical side of the speakers’ roles as well as working as part of a wider organisation, and building a career in data science.

Highlighting the importance of the new seminar series, Prof Nick Whiteley (Compass Director) says…

Prof Nick Whiteley addresses industry partners

Compass aims to develop scientific and professionally agility in its students. Our goal is to connect technical expertise in data science with experience of thinking, communicating and collaborating across disciplines and across sectors. In our new DataScience@Work seminar series, Compass partners from industry will share insights into the key role of Data Science within their organisations, their objectives and future outlook. This is a great opportunity for our students to learn about career trajectories beyond academia, helping shape their aspirations and personal goals for life beyond the PhD. I’m especially grateful to Adarga, CheckRisk, IBM Research, Improbable, and Shell for leading this first season of DataScience@Work and for their ongoing support for Compass.

For further information on the seminar series, including invited speakers to the 2020/21 session, see the DataScience@work page.

 

Compass Special Lecture: Jonty Rougier

Compass is excited to announce that Jonty Rougier (2021 recipient of the Barnett Award) will be delivering a Compass Special Lecture.

Jonty’s experience lies in Computer Experiments, computational statistics and Machine Learning, uncertainty and risk assessment, and decision support. In 2021, he was awarded Barnett Award by the RSS, which is made to those internationally recognised for contributions in the field of environmental statistics, risk and uncertainty quantification. Rougier has also advised several UK Government departments and agencies, including a secondment to the Cabinet Office in 2016/17 to contribute to the UK National Risk Assessment.

 

Student Perspectives: LV Datathon – Insurance Claim Prediction

A post by Doug Corbin, PhD student on the Compass programme.

Introduction

In a recent bout of friendly competition, students from the Compass and Interactive AI CDT’s were divided into eight teams to take part in a two week Datathon, hosted by insurance provider LV. A Datathon is a short, intensive competition, posing a data-driven challenge to the teams. The challenge was to construct the best predictive model for (the size of) insurance claims, using an anonymised, artificial data set generously provided by LV. Each team’s solution was given three important criteria, on which their solutions would be judged:

  • Accuracy – How well the solution performs at predicting insurance claims.
  • Explainability – The ability to understand and explain how the solution calculates its predictions; It is important to be able to explain to a customers how their quote has been calculated.
  • Creativity – The solution’s incorporation of new and unique ideas.

Students were given the opportunity to put their experience in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence to the test on something resembling real life data, forming cross-CDT relationships in the process.

Data and Modelling

Before training a machine learning model, the data must first be processed into a numerical format. To achieve this, most teams transformed categorical features into a series of 0’s and 1’s (representing the value of the category), using a well known process called one-hot encoding. Others recognised that certain features had a natural order to them, and opted to map them to integers corresponding to their ordered position.

A common consideration amongst all the teams’ analysis was feature importance. Out of the many methods/algorithms which were used to evaluate the relative importance of the features, notable mentions are Decision Trees, LASSO optimisation, Permutation Importance and SHAP Values. The specific details of these methods are beyond the scope of this blog post, but they all share a common goal, to rank features according to how important they are in predicting claim amounts. In many of the solutions, feature importance was used to simplify the models by excluding features with little to no predictive power. For others, it was used as a post analysis step to increase explainability i.e. to show which features where most important for a particular claim prediction. As a part of the feature selection process, all teams considered the ethical implications of the data, with many choosing to exclude certain features to mitigate social bias.

Interestingly, almost all teams incorporated some form of Gradient Boosted Decision Trees (GBDT) into their solution, either for feature selection or regression. This involves constructing multiple decision trees, which are aggregated to give the final prediction. A decision tree can be thought of as a sequence of binary questions about the features (e.g. Is the insured vehicle a sports car? Is the car a write off?), which lead to a (constant) prediction depending on the the answers. In the case of GBDT, decision trees are constructed sequentially, each new tree attempting to capture structure in the data which has been overlooked by its predecessors. The final estimate is a weighted sum of the trees, where the weights are optimised using (the gradient of) a specified loss function e.g. Mean-Squared Error (MSE),

MSE = \frac{1}{N} \sum_{n = 1}^N (y_n - \hat{y}_n)^2.

Many of the teams trialled multiple regression models, before ultimately settling on a tree-based model. However, it is well-known that tree-based models are prone to overfitting the training data. Indeed, many of the teams were surprised to see such significant difference between the training/testing Mean Absolute Error (MAE),

MAE = \frac{1}{N} \sum_{n = 1}^N |y_n - \hat{y}_n|.

Results

After two weeks of hard-work, the students came forward to present their solutions to a judging panel formed of LV representatives and CDT directors. The success of each solution was measured via the MAE of their predictions on the testing data set. Anxious to find out the results, the following winners were announced.

Accuracy Winners

Pre-processing: Categorical features one-hot encoded or mapped to integers where appropriate.

Regression Model: Gradient Boosted Decision Trees.

Testing MAE: 69.77

The winning team (in accuracy) was able to dramatically reduce their testing MAE through their choice of loss function. Loss functions quantify how good/bad a regression model is performing during the training process, and it is used to optimise the linear combination of decision trees. While most teams used the popular loss function, Mean-Squared Error, the winning team instead used Least Absolute Deviationswhich is equivalent to optimising for the MAE while training the model.

Explainability (Joint) Winners

After much deliberation amongst the judging panel, two teams were awarded joint first place in the explainability category!

Team 1: 

Pre-processing: Categorical features one-hot encoded or mapped to integers where appropriate. Features centred and scaled to have mean 0 and standard deviation 1, then selected using Gradient Boosted Decision Trees.

Regression Model: K-Nearest-Neighbours Regression

Testing MAE: 75.25

This team used Gradient Boosted Decision Trees for feature selection, combined with K-Nearest-Neighbours (KNN) Regression to model the claim amounts. KNN regression is simple in nature; given a new claim to be predicted, the K “most similar” claims in the training set are averaged (weighted according to similarity) to produce the final prediction. It is thus explainable in the sense that for every prediction you can see exactly which neighbours contributed, and what similarities they shared. The judging panel noted that, from a consumer’s perspective, they may not be satisfied with their insurance quote being based on just K neighbours.

Team 2:

Pre-processing: All categorical features one-hot encoded.

Regression Model: Gradient Boosted Decision Trees. SHAP values used for post-analysis explainability.

Testing MAE: 80.3.

The judging panel was impressed by this team’s decision to impose monotonicity in the claim predictions with respect to the numerical features. This asserts that, for monotonic features, the claim prediction must move in a constant direction (increasing or decreasing) if the numerical feature is moving in a constant direction. For example, a customer’s policy excess is the amount they will have to pay towards a claim made on their insurance. It stands to reason that increasing the policy excess (while other features remain constant) should not increase their insurance quote. If this constraint is satisfied, we say that the insurance quote is monotonic decreasing with respect to the policy excess. Further, SHAP values were used to explain the importance/effect of each feature on the model.

Creativity Winners

Pre-processing: Categorical features one-hot encoded or mapped to integers where appropriate. New feature engineered from Vehicle Size and Vehicle Class. Features selected using Permutation Importance.

Regression Model: Gradient Boosted Decision Trees. Presented post-analysis mediation/moderation study of the features.

Testing MAE: 76.313.

The winning team for creativity presented unique and intriguing methods for understanding and manipulating the data. This team noticed that the features, Vehicle Size and Vehicle Class, are intrinsically related e.g. They investigated whether a large vehicle would likely yield a higher claim if it is also of luxury vehicle class. To represent this relationship, they engineered a new feature by taking a multiplicative combination of the two initial features.

As an extension of their solution, they presented an investigation of the causal relationship between the different features. Several hypothesis tests were performed, testing whether the relationship between certain features and claim amounts is moderated or mediated by an alternative feature in the data set.

  • Mediating relationships: If a feature is mediated by an alternative feature in the data set, its relationship with the claim amounts can be well explained by the alternative (potentially indicating it can be removed from the model).
  • Moderating relationships: If a feature is moderated by an alternative feature in the data set, the strength and/or direction of the relationship with the claim amounts is impacted by the alternative.

Final Thoughts

All the teams showed a great understanding of the problem and identified promising solutions. The competitive atmosphere of the LV Datathon created a notable buzz amongst the students, who were eager to present and compare their findings. As evidenced by every team’s solution, the methodological conclusion is clear: When it comes to insurance claim prediction, tree-based models are unbeaten!

New opportunity: a jointly funded studentship with FAI Farms

Compass is very excited to advertise this PhD studentship in collaboration with FAI Farms on a vision-based system for automated poultry welfare assessment through deep learning and Bayesian modelling.

About the Project

This is an exciting opportunity to join Compass’ 4-year programme with integrated training in the statistical and computational techniques of Data Science. You will be part of a dynamic cohort of PhD researchers hosted in the historic Fry Building, which has recently undergone a £35 million refurbishment as the new home for Bristol’s School of Mathematics.

FAI Farms

FAI Farms is a multi-disciplinary team working in partnership with farmers and food companies to provide practical solutions for climate and food security. FAI’s state-of-the-art strategic advice, data insight, and education services, are powered by science, technology and best practice. Our strategic and evidence-based approach is focused on driving meaningful improvements across supply chains, mitigating risks and realising long term business benefits for our partners.

The aim of this PhD project is to create a vision-based system for the automated assessment of chicken welfare for use in poultry farms. The welfare of broiler chickens is a key ethical and economic challenge for the sustainability of chicken meat production. The presentation of natural, positive behaviour is important to ensure a “good life” for livestock species as well as being an expectation for many consumers. At present there are no ways to measure this, with good welfare habitually defined as the absence of negative experience. In addition, automated tracking of individual birds is very challenging due to occlusion and complexity. In this project the student will instead harness and develop novel deep learning approaches that consider individual animals and their behaviours probabilistically within the context of local and general activity within the barn and wider flock. The inferred behaviour rates amongst the flock will then be integrated with on-farm production, health and environmental data through Bayesian time series modelling to identify risk factors for positive welfare, predict farms at risk of poor welfare, and suggest interventions that avoid this scenario.

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Student perspectives: Wessex Water Industry Focus Lab

A post by Michael Whitehouse, PhD student on the Compass programme.

Introduction

September saw the first of an exciting new series of Compass industry focus labs; with this came the chance to make use of the extensive skill sets acquired throughout the course and an opportunity to provide solutions to pressing issues of modern industry. The partner for the first focus lab, Wessex Water, posed the following question: given time series data on water flow levels in pipes, can we detect if new leaks have occurred? Given the inherent value of clean water available at the point of use and the detriments of leaking this vital resource, the challenge of ensuring an efficient system of delivery is of great importance. Hence, finding an answer to this question has the potential to provide huge economic, political, and environmental benefits for a large base of service users.

Data and Modelling:

The dataset provided by Wessex Water consisted of water flow data spanning across around 760 pipes. After this data was cleaned and processed some useful series, such as minimum nightly and average daily flow (MNF and ADF resp.), were extracted. Preliminary analysis carried out by our collaborators at Wessex Water concluded that certain types of changes in the structure of water flow data provide good indications that a leak has occurred. From this one can postulate that detecting a leak amounts to detecting these structural changes in this data. Using this principle, we began to build a framework to build solutions: detect the change; detect a new leak. Change point detection is a well-researched discipline that provides us with efficient methods for detecting statistically significant changes in the distribution of a time series and hence a toolbox with which to tackle the problem. Indeed, we at Compass have our very own active member of the change point detection research community in the shape of Dom Owens. The preliminary analysis gave that there are three types of structural change in water flow series that indicate a leak: a change in the mean of the MNF, a change in trend of the MNF, and a change in the variance of the difference between the MNF and ADF. In order to detect these changes with an algorithm we would need to transform the given series so that the original change in distribution corresponded to a change in the mean of the transformed series. These transforms included calculating generalised additive model (GAM) residuals and analysing their distribution. An example of such a GAM is given by:

\mathbb{E}[\text{flow}_t] = \beta_0 \sum_{i=1}^m f_i(x_i).

Where the x i ’s are features we want to use to predict the flow, such as the time of day or current season. The principle behind this analysis is that any change in the residual distribution corresponds to a violation of the assumption that residuals are independently, identically distributed and hence, in turn, corresponds to a deviation from the original structure we fit our GAM to.

Figure 1: GAM residual plot. Red lines correspond to detected changes in distribution, green lines indicate a repair took place.

A Change Point Detection Algorithm:

In order to detect changes in real time we would need an online change point detection algorithm, after evaluating the existing literature we elected to follow the mean change detection procedure described in [Wang and Samworth, 2016]. The user-end procedure is as follows:

  1. Calculate mean estimate \hat{\mu} on some data we assume is stationary.
  2. Feed a new observation into the algorithm. Calculate test statistics based on new data.
  3. Repeat (2) until any test statistics exceed a threshold at which point we conclude a mean change has been detected. Return to (1).

Due to our 2 week time restraint we chose to restrict ourselves to finding change points corresponding to a mean change, just one of the 3 changes we know are indicative of a leak. As per the fundamental principles of decision theory, we would like to tune and evaluate our algorithm by minimising some loss function which depends on some ‘training’ data. That is, we would like to look at some past period of time and make predictions of when leaks happened given the flow data across the same period, then we evaluate how accurate these predictions were and adjust or asses the model accordingly. However, to do this we would need to know when and where leaks actually occurred across the time period of the data, something we did not have access to. Without ‘labels’ indicating that a leak has occurred, any predictions from the model were essentially meaningless, so we sought to find a proxy. The one potentially useful dataset we did have access to was that of leak repairs. It is clear that a leak must have occurred if a repair has occurred, but for various reasons this proxy does not provide an exhaustive account of all leaks. Furthermore, we do not know which repairs correspond to leaks identified by the particular distributional change in flow data we considered. This, in turn, means that all measures of model performance must come with the caveat that they are contingent on incomplete data. If when conducting research we find out results are limited it is our duty as statisticians to report when this is the case – it is not our job to sugar coat or manipulate our findings, but to report them with the limitations and uncertainty that inextricably come alongside. Results without uncertainty are as meaningless as no results at all. This being said, all indications pointed towards the method being effective in detecting water flow data mean change points which correspond to leak repairs, giving a positive result to feedback to our friends at Wessex Water.

Final Conclusions:

Communicating statistical concepts and results to an audience of varied areas and levels of expertise is important now more than ever. The continually strengthening relationships between Compass and its industrial partners are providing students with the opportunity to gain experience in doing exactly this. The focus lab concluded with a presentation on our findings to the Wessex Water operations team,  during which we reported the procedures and results. The technical results were well supported by the demonstration of an R shiny dashboard app, which provided an intuitive interface to view the output of the developed algorithm. Of course, there is more work to be done. Expanding the algorithm to account for all 3 types of distributional change is the obvious next step. Furthermore, fitting a GAM to data for 760 pipes is not very efficient. Additional investigations into finding ways to ‘cluster’ groups of pipes together according to some notion of similarity is a natural avenue for future work in order to reduce the number of GAMS we need to fit.This experience enabled students to apply skills in statistical modelling, algorithm development, and software development to a salient problem faced by an industry partner and marked a successful start to the Compass industry focus lab series.

Student perspectives: Three Days in the life of a Silicon Gorge Start-Up

A post by Mauro Camara Escudero, PhD student on the Compass programme.

Last December the first Compass cohort partook a 3-day entrepreneurship training with SpinUp Science. Keep reading and you might just find out if the Silicon Gorge life is for you!

The Ambitious Project of SpinUp Science

SpinUp Science’s goal is to help PhD students like us develop an entrepreneurial skill-set that will come in handy if we decide to either commercialize a product, launch a start-up, or choose a consulting career.

I can already hear some of you murmur “Sure, this might be helpful for someone doing a much more applied PhD but my work is theoretical. How is that ever going to help me?”. I get that, I used to believe the same. However, partly thanks to this training, I changed my mind and realized just how valuable these skills are independently of whether you decide to stay in Academia or find a job at an established company.

Anyways, I am getting ahead of myself. Let me first guide you through what the training looked like and then we will come back to this!

Day 1 – Meeting the Client

The day started with a presentation that, on paper, promised to be yet another one of those endless and boring talks that make you reach for the Stop Video button and take a nap. The vague title “Understanding the Opportunity” surely did not help either. Instead, we were thrown right into action!

Ric and Crescent, two consultants at SpinUp Science, introduced us to their online platform where we would be spending most of our time in the next few days. Our main task for the first half-hour was to read about the start-up’s goals and then write down a series of questions to ask the founders in order to get a full picture.

Before we knew it, it was time to get ready for the client meeting and split tasks. I volunteered as Client Handler, meaning I was going to coordinate our interaction with the founders. The rest of Compass split into groups focusing on different areas: some were going to ask questions about competitors, others about the start-up product, and so on.

As we waited in the ZOOM call, I kept wondering why on earth I volunteered for the role and my initial excitement was quickly turning into despair. We had never met the founders before, let alone had any experience consulting or working for a start-up.

Once the founders joined us, and after a wobbly start, it became clear that the hard part would not be avoiding awkward silences or struggling to get information. The real challenge was being able fit all of our questions in this one-hour meeting. One thing was clear: clients love to talk about their issues and to digress.

After the meeting, we had a brief chat and wrote down our findings and thoughts on the online platform. I wish I could say we knew what we were doing, but in reality it was a mix of extreme winging and following the advice of Ric and Crescent.

Last on the agenda, was a short presentation where we learned how to go about studying the market-fit for a product, judge its competitors and potential clients, and overall how to evaluate the success of a start-up idea. That was it for the day, but the following morning we would put into practice everything we had learned up to that point.

Day 2 – Putting our Stalking Skills to good use

The start-up that we were consulting for provides data analysis software for power plants and was keen to expand in a new geographical area. Our goal for the day was therefore to:

  • understand the need for such a product in the energy market

  • research what options are available for the components of their product

  • find potential competitors and assess their offering

  • find potential clients and assess whether they already had a similar solution implemented

  • study the market in the new geographical area

This was done with a mix of good-old Google searches and cold-calling. It was a very interesting process as in the morning we were even struggling to understand what the start-up was offering, while by late afternoon we had a fairly in-depth knowledge of all the points above and we had gathered enough information to formulate more sensible questions and to assess the feasibility of the start-up’s product. One of the things I found most striking about this supervised hands-on training is that as time went on I could clearly see how I was able to filter out useless information and go to the core of what I was researching.

To aid us in our analyses, we received training on various techniques to assess competitors, clients and the financial prospect of a start-up. In addition, we also learned about why the UK is such a good place to launch a start-up, what kind of funding is available and how to look for investors and angels.

Exhausted by a day of intense researching, we knew the most demanding moments were yet to come.

Day 3 – Reporting to the Client

The final day was all geared towards preparing for our final client meeting. Ric and Crescent taught us how to use their online platform to perform PESTEL and SWOT analyses efficiently based on the insights that we gathered the day before. It was very powerful seeing a detailed report coming to life using inputs from all of our researches.

With the report in hand, several hours of training under our belt, and a clearer picture in our head, we joined the call and each one of us presented a different section of the report, while Andrea was orchestrating the interaction. Overall, the founders seemed quite impressed and admitted that had not heard of many of the competitors we had found. They were pleased by our in-depth research and, I am sure, found it very insightful.

Lessons Learned

So, was it useful?

I believe that this training gave us a glimpse of how to go about picking up a totally new area of knowledge and quickly becoming an expert on it. The time constraint allowed us to refine the way in which we filter out useless information, to get to the core of what we are trying to learn about. We also worked together as a team towards a single goal and we formulated our opinion on the start-up. Finally, we had two invaluable opportunities to present in a real-world setting and to handle diplomatically the relationship with the client.

In the end, isn’t research all about being able to pickup new knowledge quickly, filter out useless papers, working together with other researchers to develop a method and present such results to an audience?

Find out more about Mauro Camara Escudero and his work on his profile page.

IBM Research is newest Compass partner to sponsor PhD project

The University of Bristol is excited to announce IBM Research Europe as a new partner of Compass – the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Computational Statistics and Data Science. IBM scientists are collaborating with Prof. Robert Allison and Compass PhD student Anthony Stephenson, on a research project entitled Fast Bayesian Inference at Extreme Scale. The project’s aim is to extend Bayesian inference algorithms to the ‘extreme scales’ that many deep learning workloads occupy, by placing more focus on AI methodologies which furnish both an accurate prediction, and critically, a high-quality uncertainty representation for predictions.

For more than seven decades, IBM Research has defined the future of information technology with more than 3,000 researchers in 19 locations across six continents. Scientists from IBM Research have produced six Nobel Laureates, 10 U.S. National Medals of Technology, five U.S. National Medals of Science, six Turing Awards, 19 inductees in the National Academy of Sciences and 20 inductees into the U.S. National Inventors Hall of Fame

IBM has European research locations in Switzerland (Zurich), England (Hursley and Daresbury), and Ireland (Dublin), with a large development lab in Germany focused on AI, quantum computing, security and hybrid cloud.

IBM’s global labs are involved hundreds of joint projects with universities particularly throughout Europe, in research programs established by the European Union and the local governments, and in cooperation agreements with research institutes of industrial partners.

Compass is a 4-year PhD training programme focusing on Computational Statistics and Data Science. This new venture is part of the Compass mission to promote academic and professional agility in its students, equipping them with the skills and experience to work across disciplines in academia and beyond.

Anthony Stephenson is the PhD student recruited to this project says, “After several years working in industry, I am pleased to be starting the Compass programme and shifting my focus to research. Having the combined forces of the University of Bristol and IBM behind me inspires confidence and I look forward to working with members of each of them. My project, scalable inference in non-linear Bayesian models, is also a highly relevant and exciting area to work on, with many applications in modern machine learning.”

Dr Ed Pyzer-Knapp is World-Wide IBM Research Lead in AI Enriched Modelling and Simulation and says, “I am very excited to work with Anthony and Robert – scaling Bayesian inference is a really important area of machine learning research; bringing to bear our mantra of fusing of bits and neurons to further develop the future of computing. This project is a great opportunity to further strengthen our relationship with the University of Bristol.”

Prof Robert Allison is Anthony’s academic supervisor at the University of Bristol and says, “I’m really looking forward to working with Anthony and Ed on a highly important and widely applicable area of machine learning which encompasses mathematical research, data-analysis, algorithm development and efficient large-scale computation. In addition, I see this project as an ideal opportunity to seed wider ranging data-science and machine learning collaborations between IBM Research, their academic partners and the University of Bristol.”

As Director of Compass, Prof Nick Whiteley say “I’m absolutely delighted to welcome IBM Research to Compass. This project is a fantastic opportunity for Anthony to tackle a very challenging and increasingly important AI research problem under Prof. Allison and Dr. Pyzer-Knapp’s supervision. As this collaboration develops, I look forward to all Compass students learning about IBM’s vision for the future of AI and its connection to the expertise in statistical methodology and computing they will acquire through the Compass training programme.”

JGI event: Data Science Seminars

The Jean Golding Institute runs an annual series of Data Science Seminars

Upcoming seminars (if you are interested in attending you can sign up with Eventbrite using the links below):

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